Recommended word list

To help ensure consistency in the documentation, the Technical Writing team recommends these word choices. In addition:

For guidance not on this page, we defer to these style guides:

.gitlab-ci.yml file

Use backticks and lowercase for the .gitlab-ci.yml file.

When possible, use the full phrase: the .gitlab-ci.yml file

Although users can specify another name for their CI/CD configuration file, in most cases, use the .gitlab-ci.yml file instead.

& (ampersand)

Do not use Latin abbreviations. Use and instead, unless you are documenting a UI element that uses an &.

@mention

Try to avoid @mention. Say mention instead, and consider linking to the mentions topic. Don’t use backticks.

2FA, two-factor authentication

Spell out two-factor authentication in sentence case for the first use and in topic titles, and 2FA thereafter. If the first word in a sentence, do not capitalize factor or authentication. For example:

  • Two-factor authentication (2FA) helps secure your account. Set up 2FA when you first sign in.

above

Try to avoid using above when referring to an example or table in a documentation page. If required, use previous instead. For example:

  • In the previous example, the dog had fleas.

Do not use above when referring to versions of the product. Use later instead.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and later…

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and above…
  • In GitLab 14.4 and higher…
  • In GitLab 14.4 and newer…

access level

Access levels are different than roles or permissions. When you create a user, you choose an access level: Regular, Auditor, or Administrator.

Capitalize these words when you refer to the UI. Otherwise use lowercase.

add

Use add when an object already exists. If the object does not exist yet, use create instead. Add is the opposite of remove.

For example:

  • Add a user to the list.
  • Add an issue to the epic.

Do not confuse add with create.

Do not use Add new.

Admin area

Use sentence case for Admin area. The UI uses title case.

Do not use administrator area, administration area, or other variants.

Admin Mode

Use title case for Admin Mode. The UI uses title case.

administrator

Use administrator access instead of admin when talking about a user’s access level.

admin access level

An administrator is not a role or permission.

Use:

  • To do this thing, you must be an administrator.
  • To do this thing, you must have administrator access.

Instead of:

  • To do this thing, you must have the Admin role.

Use lowercase for advanced search to refer to the faster, more efficient search across the entire GitLab instance.

agent

Use lowercase to refer to the GitLab agent for Kubernetes. For example:

  • To connect your cluster to GitLab, use the GitLab agent for Kubernetes.
  • Install the agent in your cluster.
  • Select an agent from the list.

Do not use title case for GitLab Agent or GitLab Agent for Kubernetes.

agent access token

The token generated when you create an agent for Kubernetes. Use agent access token, not:

  • registration token
  • secret token
  • authentication token

agnostic

Instead of agnostic, use platform-independent or vendor-neutral. (Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

AI, artificial intelligence

Use AI. Do not spell out artificial intelligence.

AI-powered DevSecOps platform

If preceded by GitLab, capitalize Platform. For example, the GitLab AI-powered DevSecOps Platform.

air gap, air-gapped

Use offline environment to describe installations that have physical barriers or security policies that prevent or limit internet access. Do not use air gap, air gapped, or air-gapped. For example:

  • The firewall policies in an offline environment prevent the computer from accessing the internet.

allow, enable

Try to avoid allow and enable, unless you are talking about security-related features.

Use:

  • You can add a file to your repository.

Instead of:

  • This feature allows you to add a file to your repository.
  • This feature enables users to add files to their repository.

This phrasing is more active and is from the user perspective, rather than the person who implemented the feature. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

analytics

Use lowercase for analytics and its variations, like contribution analytics and issue analytics. However, if the UI has different capitalization, make the documentation match the UI.

For example:

  • You can view merge request analytics for a project. They are displayed on the Merge Request Analytics dashboard.

ancestor

To refer to a parent item that’s one or more level above in the hierarchy, use ancestor.

Do not use grandparent.

Examples:

  • An ancestor group, a group in the project’s hierarchy.
  • An ancestor epic, an epic in the issue’s hierarchy.
  • A group and all its ancestors.

See also: child, descendant, and subgroup.

and/or

Instead of and/or, use or or rewrite the sentence to spell out both options.

and so on

Do not use and so on. Instead, be more specific. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

area

Use section instead of area. The only exception is the Admin area.

as

Do not use as to mean because.

Use:

  • Because none of the endpoints return an ID…

Instead of:

  • As none of the endpoints return an ID…

as well as

Instead of as well as, use and.

associate

Do not use associate when describing adding issues to epics, or users to issues, merge requests, or epics.

Instead, use assign. For example:

  • Assign the issue to an epic.
  • Assign a user to the issue.

authenticated user

Use authenticated user instead of other variations, like signed in user or logged in user.

before you begin

Use before you begin when documenting the tasks that must be completed or the conditions that must be met before a user can complete a tutorial. Do not use requirements or prerequisites.

For more information, see the tutorial page type.

For task topic types, use prerequisites instead.

below

Try to avoid below when referring to an example or table in a documentation page. If required, use following instead. For example:

  • In the following example, the dog has fleas.

beta

Use lowercase for beta. For example:

  • The feature is in beta.
  • This is a beta feature.
  • This beta release is ready to test.

You might also want to link to this topic when writing about beta features.

blacklist

Do not use blacklist. Another option is denylist. (Vale rule: InclusionCultural.yml)

board

Use lowercase for boards, issue boards, and epic boards.

box

Use text box to refer to the UI field. Do not use field or box. For example:

  • In the Variable name text box, enter a value.

branch

Use branch by itself to describe a branch. For specific branches, use these terms only:

  • default branch: The primary branch in the repository. Users can use the UI to set the default branch. For examples that use the default branch, use main instead of master.
  • source branch: The branch you’re merging from.
  • target branch: The branch you’re merging to.
  • current branch: The branch you have checked out. This branch might be the default branch, a branch you’ve created, a source branch, or some other branch.

Do not use the terms feature branch or merge request branch. Be as specific as possible. For example:

  • The branch you have checked out…
  • The branch you added commits to…

bullet

Don’t refer to individual items in an ordered or unordered list as bullets. Use list item instead. If you need to be less ambiguous, you can use:

  • Ordered list item for items in an ordered list.
  • Unordered list item for items in an unordered list.

button

Don’t use a descriptor with button.

Use:

  • Select Run pipelines.

Instead of:

  • Select the Run pipelines button.

cannot, can not

Use cannot instead of can not.

See also contractions.

Chat, GitLab Duo Chat

Use Chat with a capital c for Chat or GitLab Duo Chat.

On first use on a page, use GitLab Duo Chat. Thereafter, use Chat by itself.

checkbox

Use one word for checkbox. Do not use check box.

You select (not check or enable) and clear (not deselect or disable) checkboxes. For example:

  • Select the Protect environment checkbox.
  • Clear the Protect environment checkbox.

If you must refer to the checkbox, you can say it is selected or cleared. For example:

  • Ensure the Protect environment checkbox is cleared.
  • Ensure the Protect environment checkbox is selected.

(For deselect, Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

checkout, check out

Use check out as a verb. For the Git command, use checkout.

  • Use git checkout to check out a branch locally.
  • Check out the files you want to edit.

CI, CD

When talking about GitLab features, use CI/CD. Do not use CI or CD alone.

CI/CD

CI/CD is always uppercase. No need to spell it out on first use.

You can omit CI/CD when the context is clear, especially after the first use. For example:

  • Test your code in a CI/CD pipeline. Configure the pipeline to run for merge requests.
  • Store the value in a CI/CD variable. Set the variable to masked.

CI/CD minutes

Do not use CI/CD minutes. This term was renamed to compute minutes.

child

Always use as a compound noun.

Examples:

  • child issue
  • child epic
  • child objective
  • child key result
  • child pipeline

See also: descendant, parent and subgroup.

click

Do not use click. Instead, use select with buttons, links, menu items, and lists. Select applies to more devices, while click is more specific to a mouse.

However, you can make an exception for right-click and click-through demo.

cloud licensing

Do not use the phrase cloud licensing. Instead, focus on the fact that this subscription is synchronized with GitLab.

For example:

  • Your instance must be able to synchronize your subscription data with GitLab.

cloud native

When you’re talking about using a Kubernetes cluster to host GitLab, you’re talking about a cloud-native version of GitLab. This version is different than the larger, more monolithic Linux package that is used to deploy GitLab.

You can also use cloud-native GitLab for short. It should be hyphenated and lowercase.

Code explanation

Use sentence case for Code explanation.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Code explanation. Thereafter, use Code explanation by itself.

Code review summary

Use sentence case for Code review summary.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Code review summary. Thereafter, use Code review summary by itself.

Code Suggestions

Use title case for Code Suggestions. On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Code Suggestions.

Code Suggestions should always be plural, and is capitalized even if it’s generic.

Examples:

  • Use Code Suggestions to display suggestions as you type. (This phrase describes the feature.)
  • As you type, Code Suggestions are displayed. (This phrase is generic but still uses capital letters.)

collapse

Use collapse instead of close when you are talking about expanding or collapsing a section in the UI.

command line

Use From the command line to introduce commands.

Hyphenate when using as an adjective. For example, a command-line tool.

compute

Use compute for the resources used by runners to run CI/CD jobs.

Related terms:

  • compute minutes: How compute usage is calculated. For example, 400 compute minutes.
  • compute quota: The limit of compute minutes that a namespace can use each month.
  • compute usage: The number of compute minutes that the namespace has used from the monthly quota.

compute minutes

Use compute minutes instead of these (or similar) terms:

  • CI/CD minutes
  • CI minutes
  • pipeline minutes
  • CI pipeline minutes
  • pipeline minutes

For more information, see epic 2150.

configuration

When you update a collection of settings, call it a configuration.

configure

Use configure after a feature or product has been set up. For example:

  1. Set up your installation.
  2. Configure your installation.

confirmation dialog

Use confirmation dialog to describe the dialog that asks you to confirm an action. For example:

  • On the confirmation dialog, select OK.

Do not use confirmation box or confirmation dialog box. See also dialog.

container registry

When documenting the GitLab container registry features and functionality, use lowercase.

Use:

  • The GitLab container registry supports A, B, and C.
  • You can push a Docker image to your project’s container registry.

create

Use create when an object does not exist and you are creating it for the first time. Create is the opposite of delete.

For example:

  • Create an issue.

Do not confuse create with add.

Do not use create new. The word create implies that the object is new, and the extra word is not necessary.

currently

Do not use currently when talking about the product or its features. The documentation describes the product as it is today. (Vale rule: CurrentStatus.yml)

custom role

Use custom role when referring to a role created with specific customized permissions.

When referring to a non-custom role, use default role.

data

Use data as a singular noun.

Use:

  • Data is collected.
  • The data shows a performance increase.

Instead of:

  • Data are collected.
  • The data show a performance increase.

default role

Use default role when referring to the following predefined roles that have no customized permissions added:

  • Guest
  • Reporter
  • Developer
  • Maintainer
  • Owner
  • Minimal Access

Do not use static role, built-in role, or predefined role.

delete

Use delete when an object is completely deleted. Delete is the opposite of create.

When the object continues to exist, use remove instead. For example, you can remove an issue from an epic, but the issue still exists.

Dependency Proxy

Use title case for the GitLab Dependency Proxy.

deploy board

Use lowercase for deploy board.

descendant

To refer to a child item that’s one or more level below in the hierarchy, use descendant.

Do not use grandchild.

Examples:

  • An descendant project, a project in the group’s hierarchy.
  • An descendant issue, an issue in the epic’s hierarchy.
  • A group and all its descendants.

See also: ancestor, child, and subgroup.

Developer

When writing about the Developer role:

  • Use a capital D.
  • Do not use bold.
  • Do not use the phrase, if you are a developer to mean someone who is assigned the Developer role. Instead, write it out. For example, if you are assigned the Developer role.
  • To describe a situation where the Developer role is the minimum required:
    • Use: at least the Developer role
    • Instead of: the Developer role or higher

Do not use Developer permissions. A user who is assigned the Developer role has a set of associated permissions.

DevSecOps platform

If preceded by GitLab, capitalize Platform. For example, the GitLab DevSecOps Platform.

dialog

Use dialog rather than any of these alternatives:

  • dialog box
  • modal
  • modal dialog
  • modal window
  • pop-up
  • pop-up window
  • window

See also confirmation dialog. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

When the dialog is the location of an action, use on as a preposition. For example:

  • On the Grant permission dialog, select Group.

See also on.

disable

See the Microsoft Style Guide for guidance on disable. Use inactive or off instead.

disallow

Use prevent instead of disallow. (Vale rule: Substitutions.yml)

Discussion summary

Use sentence case for Discussion summary.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Discussion summary. Thereafter, use Discussion summary by itself.

Docker-in-Docker, dind

Use Docker-in-Docker when you are describing running a Docker container by using the Docker executor.

Use dind in backticks to describe the container name: docker:dind. Otherwise, spell it out.

downgrade

To be more upbeat and precise, do not use downgrade. Focus instead on the action the user is taking.

  • For changing to earlier GitLab versions, use roll back.
  • For changing to lower GitLab tiers, use change the subscription tier.

download

Use download to describe saving data to a user’s device. For details, see the Microsoft style guide.

Do not confuse download with export.

Use dropdown list to refer to the UI element. Do not use dropdown without list after it. Do not use drop-down (hyphenated), dropdown menu, or other variants.

For example:

  • From the Visibility dropdown list, select Public.

earlier

Use earlier when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and earlier.

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and lower.
  • In GitLab 14.1 and older.

easily

Do not use easily. If the user doesn’t find the process to be easy, we lose their trust.

e.g.

Do not use Latin abbreviations. Use for example, such as, for instance, or like instead. (Vale rule: LatinTerms.yml)

ellipsis

When documenting UI text, if the UI includes an ellipsis, do not include the ellipsis in the documentation. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

Use:

  • Create new

Instead of:

  • Create new…

email

Do not use e-mail with a hyphen. When plural, use emails or email messages. (Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

email address

Use email address when referring to addresses used in emails. Do not shorten to email, which are messages.

emoji

Use emoji to refer to the plural form of emoji.

enable

See the Microsoft Style Guide for guidance on enable. Use active or on instead.

enter

In most cases, use enter rather than type.

  • Enter encompasses multiple ways to enter information, including speech and keyboard.
  • Enter assumes that the user puts a value in a field and then moves the cursor outside the field (or presses Enter). Enter includes both the entering of the content and the action to validate the content.

For example:

  • In the Variable name text box, enter a value.
  • In the Variable name text box, enter my text.

When you use Enter to refer to the key on a keyboard, use the HTML <kbd> tag:

  • To view the list of results, press Enter.

See also type.

epic

Use lowercase for epic.

See also associate.

epic board

Use lowercase for epic board.

etc.

Try to avoid etc.. Be as specific as you can. Do not use and so on as a replacement.

Use:

  • You can update objects, like merge requests and issues.

Instead of:

  • You can update objects, like merge requests, issues, etc.

expand

Use expand instead of open when you are talking about expanding or collapsing a section in the UI.

experiment

Use lowercase for experiment. For example:

  • This feature is an experiment.
  • These features are experiments.
  • This experiment is ready to test.

If you must, you can use experimental.

You might also want to link to this topic when writing about experimental features.

export

Use export to indicate translating raw data, which is not represented by a file in GitLab, into a standard file format.

You can differentiate export from download because:

  • Often, you can use export options to change the output.
  • Exported data is not necessarily downloaded to a user’s device.

For example:

  • Export the contents of your report to CSV format.

Do not confuse with download.

FAQ

We want users to find information quickly, and they rarely search for the term FAQ. Information in FAQs belongs with other similar information, under an easily searchable topic title.

feature

You should rarely need to use the word feature. Instead, explain what GitLab does. For example, use:

  • Use merge requests to incorporate changes into the target branch.

Instead of:

  • Use the merge request feature to incorporate changes into the target branch.

feature branch

Do not use feature branch. See branch.

field

Use text box instead of field or box.

Use:

  • In the Variable name text box, enter my text.

Instead of:

  • In the Variable name field, enter my text.

However, you can make an exception when you are writing a task and you need to refer to all of the fields at once. For example:

  1. On the left sidebar, select Search or go to and find your project.
  2. Select Settings > CI/CD.
  3. Expand General pipelines.
  4. Complete the fields.

Learn more about documenting multiple fields at once.

filename

Use one word for filename. When using filename as a variable, use <filename>.

(Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

filter

When you are viewing a list of items, like issues or merge requests, you filter the list by the available attributes. For example, you might filter by assignee or reviewer.

Filtering is different from searching.

foo

Do not use foo in product documentation. You can use it in our API and contributor documentation, but try to use a clearer and more meaningful example instead.

fork

A fork is a project that was created from a upstream project by using the forking process.

The upstream project (also known as the source project) and the fork have a fork relationship and are linked.

If the fork relationship is removed, the fork is unlinked from the upstream project.

full screen

Use two words for full screen. (Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

future tense

When possible, use present tense instead of future tense. For example, use after you execute this command, GitLab displays the result instead of after you execute this command, GitLab will display the result. (Vale rule: FutureTense.yml)

GB, gigabytes

For GB and MB, follow the Microsoft guidance.

Geo

Use title case for Geo.

generally available, general availability

Use lowercase for generally available and general availability. For example:

  • This feature is generally available.

Use generally available more often. For example, do not say:

  • This feature has reached general availability.

You can use GA to indicate general availability if you spell it out on first use.

GitLab

Do not make GitLab possessive (GitLab’s). This guidance follows GitLab Trademark Guidelines.

GitLab Dedicated

Use GitLab Dedicated to refer to the product offering. It refers to a GitLab instance that’s hosted and managed by GitLab for customers.

GitLab Dedicated can be referred to as a single-tenant SaaS service.

Do not use Dedicated by itself. Always use GitLab Dedicated.

GitLab Duo

Do not use Duo by itself. Always use GitLab Duo.

On first use on a page, use GitLab Duo <featurename>. As of Dec, 2023, the following are the names of GitLab Duo features:

  • GitLab Duo Chat
  • GitLab Duo Code Suggestions
  • GitLab Duo Suggested Reviewers
  • GitLab Duo Value stream forecasting
  • GitLab Duo Discussion summary
  • GitLab Duo Merge request summary
  • GitLab Duo Code review summary
  • GitLab Duo Code explanation
  • GitLab Duo Vulnerability explanation
  • GitLab Duo Vulnerability resolution
  • GitLab Duo Test generation
  • GitLab Duo for the CLI
  • GitLab Duo Root cause analysis
  • GitLab Duo Issue description generation

After the first use, use the feature name without GitLab Duo.

GitLab Duo Pro

Always use GitLab Duo Pro for the add-on. Do not use Duo Pro unless approved by legal.

You can use the GitLab Duo Pro add-on (with this capitalization) but you do not need to use add-on and should leave it off when you can.

GitLab Flavored Markdown

When possible, spell out GitLab Flavored Markdown.

If you must abbreviate, do not use GFM. Use GLFM instead.

GitLab Helm chart, GitLab chart

To deploy a cloud-native version of GitLab, use:

  • The GitLab Helm chart (long version)
  • The GitLab chart (short version)

Do not use the gitlab chart, the GitLab Chart, or the cloud-native chart.

You use the GitLab Helm chart to deploy cloud-native GitLab in a Kubernetes cluster.

If you use it in a context of describing the different installation methods use Helm chart (Kubernetes).

GitLab Pages

For consistency and branding, use GitLab Pages rather than Pages.

However, if you use GitLab Pages for the first mention on a page or in the UI, you can use Pages thereafter.

GitLab Runner

Use title case for GitLab Runner. This is the product you install. For more information about the decision for this usage, see this issue.

See also:

GitLab SaaS

GitLab SaaS refers to both GitLab.com (multi-tenant SaaS) as well as GitLab Dedicated (single-tenant SaaS).

Try to avoid GitLab SaaS and instead, refer to the specific offering instead.

GitLab self-managed

Use GitLab self-managed to refer to the product offering. It refers to a GitLab instance managed by customers themselves.

GitLab.com

Use GitLab.com to refer to the URL or product offering. GitLab.com is the instance that’s managed by GitLab.

guide

We want to speak directly to users. On docs.gitlab.com, do not use guide as part of a page title. For example, Snowplow Guide. Instead, speak about the feature itself, and how to use it. For example, Use Snowplow to do xyz.

Guest

When writing about the Guest role:

  • Use a capital G.
  • Write it out:
    • Use: if you are assigned the Guest role
    • Instead of: if you are a guest
  • When the Guest role is the minimum required role:
    • Use: at least the Guest role
    • Instead of: the Guest role or higher

Do not use bold.

Do not use Guest permissions. A user who is assigned the Guest role has a set of associated permissions.

handy

Do not use handy. If the user doesn’t find the feature or process to be handy, we lose their trust. (Vale rule: Simplicity.yml)

high availability, HA

Do not use high availability or HA, except in the GitLab reference architectures. Instead, direct readers to the reference architectures for more information about configuring GitLab for handling greater amounts of users.

Do not use phrases like high availability setup to mean a multiple node environment. Instead, use multi-node setup or similar.

higher

Do not use higher when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and later…

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and higher…
  • In GitLab 14.4 and above…

hit

Don’t use hit to mean press.

Use:

  • Press ENTER.

Instead of:

  • Hit the ENTER button.

I

Do not use first-person singular. Use you or rewrite the phrase instead.

i.e.

Do not use Latin abbreviations. Use that is instead. (Vale rule: LatinTerms.yml)

in order to

Do not use in order to. Use to instead. (Vale rule: Wordy.yml)

indexes, indices

For the plural of index, use indexes.

However, for Elasticsearch, use indices.

Installation from source

When referring to the installation method using the self-compiled code, refer to it as self-compiled.

Use:

  • For self-compiled installations…

Instead of:

  • For installations from source…

For more information, see the different installation methods.

-ing words

Remove -ing words whenever possible. They can be difficult to translate, and more precise terms are usually available. For example:

  • Instead of The files using storage are deleted, use The files that use storage are deleted.
  • Instead of Delete files using the Edit button, use Use the Edit button to delete files.
  • Instead of Replicating your server is required, use You must replicate your server.

issue

Use lowercase for issue.

issue board

Use lowercase for issue board.

Issue description generation

Use sentence case for Issue description generation.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Issue description generation. Thereafter, use Issue description generation by itself.

issue weights

Use lowercase for issue weights.

IP address

Use IP address when refering to addresses used with Internet Protocal (IP). Do not refer to an IP address as an IP.

it

When you use the word it, ensure the word it refers to is obvious. If it’s not obvious, repeat the word rather than using it.

Use:

  • The field returns a connection. The field accepts four arguments.

Instead of:

  • The field returns a connection. It accepts four arguments.

See also this, these, that, those.

job

Do not use build to be synonymous with job. A job is defined in the .gitlab-ci.yml file and runs as part of a pipeline.

If you want to use CI with the word job, use CI/CD job rather than CI job.

Kubernetes executor

GitLab Runner can run jobs on a Kubernetes cluster. To do this, GitLab Runner uses the Kubernetes executor.

When referring to this feature, use:

  • Kubernetes executor for GitLab Runner
  • Kubernetes executor

Do not use:

  • GitLab Runner Kubernetes executor, because this can infringe on the Kubernetes trademark.

later

Use later when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and later…

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and higher…
  • In GitLab 14.1 and above…
  • In GitLab 14.1 and newer…

level

If you can, avoid using level in the context of an instance, project, or group.

Use:

  • This setting is turned on for the instance.
  • This setting is turned on for the group and its subgroups.
  • This setting is turned on for projects.

Instead of:

  • This setting is turned on at the instance level.
  • This setting is turned on at the group level.
  • This is a project-level setting.

list

Do not use list when referring to a dropdown list. Use the full phrase dropdown list instead.

Also, do not use list when referring to a page. For example, the Issues page is populated with a list of issues. However, you should call it the Issues page, and not the Issues list.

license

Licenses are different than subscriptions.

  • A license grants users access to the subscription they purchased. The license includes information like the number of seats and subscription dates.
  • A subscription is the subscription tier that the user purchases.

Do not use the term cloud license.

The following terms are displayed in the UI and in emails. You can use them when necessary:

  • Online license - a license synchronized with GitLab
  • Offline license - a license not synchronized with GitLab
  • Legacy license - a license created before synchronization was possible

However, if you can, rather than using the term, use the more specific description instead.

Use:

  • Add a license to your instance.
  • Purchase a subscription.

Instead of:

  • Buy a license.
  • Purchase a license.

limitations

Do not use limitations. Use known issues instead.

log in, log on

Do not use:

  • log in.
  • log on.
  • login

Use sign in instead.

However, if the user interface has Log in, you should match the UI.

logged-in user, logged in user

Use authenticated user instead of logged-in user or logged in user.

lower

Do not use lower when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and earlier.

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and lower.
  • In GitLab 14.1 and older.

machine learning

Use lowercase for machine learning.

When machine learning is used as an adjective, like a machine learning model, do not hyphenate. While a hyphen might be more grammatically correct, we risk becoming inconsistent if we try to be more precise.

Maintainer

When writing about the Maintainer role:

  • Use a capital M.
  • Write it out.
    • Use: if you are assigned the Maintainer role
    • Instead of: if you are a maintainer
  • When the Maintainer role is the minimum required role:
    • Use: at least the Maintainer role
    • Instead of: the Maintainer role or higher

Do not use bold.

Do not use Maintainer permissions. A user who is assigned the Maintainer role has a set of associated permissions.

mankind

Do not use mankind. Use people or humanity instead. (Vale rule: InclusionGender.yml)

manpower

Do not use manpower. Use words like workforce or GitLab team members. (Vale rule: InclusionGender.yml)

master

Do not use master. Use main when you need a sample default branch name. (Vale rule: InclusionCultural.yml)

may, might

Might means something has the probability of occurring. Might is often used in troubleshooting documentation.

May gives permission to do something. Consider can instead of may.

Consider rewording phrases that use these terms. These terms often indicate possibility and doubt, and technical writing strives to be precise.

See also you can.

Use:

  • The committed_date and authored_date fields are generated from different sources, and might not be identical.
  • A typical pipeline consists of four stages, executed in the following order:

Instead of:

  • The committed_date and authored_date fields are generated from different sources, and may not be identical.
  • A typical pipeline might consist of four stages, executed in the following order:

MB, megabytes

For MB and GB, follow the Microsoft guidance.

member

When you add a user account to a group or project, the user account becomes a member.

merge request branch

Do not use merge request branch. See branch.

merge requests

Use lowercase for merge requests. If you use MR as the acronym, spell it out on first use.

Merge request summary

Use sentence case for Merge request summary.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Merge request summary. Thereafter, use Merge request summary by itself.

milestones

Use lowercase for milestones.

Minimal Access

When writing about the Minimal Access role:

  • Use a capital M and a capital A.
  • Write it out:
    • Use: if you are assigned the Minimal Access role
    • Instead of: if you are a Minimal Access user
  • When the Minimal Access role is the minimum required role:
    • Use: at least the Minimal Access role
    • Instead of: the Minimal Access role or higher

Do not use bold.

Do not use Minimal Access permissions. A user who is assigned the Minimal Access role has a set of associated permissions.

n/a, N/A, not applicable

When possible, use not applicable. Spelling out the phrase helps non-English speaking users and avoids capitalization inconsistencies.

Do not use navigate. Use go instead. For example:

  • Go to this webpage.
  • Open a terminal and go to the runner directory.

(Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

need to

Try to avoid need to, because it’s wordy.

For example, when a variable is required, instead of You need to set the variable, use:

  • Set the variable.
  • You must set the variable.

When the variable is recommended:

  • You should set the variable.

When the variable is optional:

  • You can set the variable.

new

Often, you can avoid the word new. When you create an object, it is new, so you don’t need this additional word.

See also create and add.

newer

Do not use newer when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and later…

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.4 and higher…
  • In GitLab 14.4 and above…
  • In GitLab 14.4 and newer…

normal, normally

Don’t use normal to mean the usual, typical, or standard way of doing something. Use those terms instead.

Use:

  • Typically, you specify a certificate.
  • Usually, you specify a certificate.
  • Follow the standard Git workflow.

Instead of:

  • Normally, you specify a certificate.
  • Follow the normal Git workflow.

(Vale rule: Normal.yml)

note that

Do not use note that because it’s wordy.

Use:

  • You can change the settings.

Instead of:

  • Note that you can change the settings.

offerings

The current product offerings are:

The availability details reflect these offerings.

older

Do not use older when talking about version numbers.

Use:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and earlier.

Instead of:

  • In GitLab 14.1 and lower.
  • In GitLab 14.1 and older.

Omnibus GitLab

When referring to the installation method that uses the Linux package, refer to it as Linux package.

Use:

  • For installations that use the Linux package…

Instead of:

  • For installations that use Omnibus GitLab…

For more information, see the different installation methods.

on

When documenting high-level UI elements, use on as a preposition. For example:

  • On the left sidebar, select Settings > CI/CD.
  • On the Grant permission dialog, select Group.

Do not use from or in. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

once

The word once means one time. Don’t use it to mean after or when.

Use:

  • When the process is complete…

Instead of:

  • Once the process is complete…

only

Put the word only next to the word it modifies.

  • You can create only private projects.

In this example, only modifies the noun projects. The sentence means you can create one type of project–a private project.

  • You can only create private projects.

In this example, only modifies the verb create. This sentence means that you can’t perform other actions, like deleting private projects, or adding users to them.

override

Use override to indicate temporary replacement.

For example, a value might be overridden when a job runs. The original value does not change.

overwrite

Use overwrite to indicate permanent replacement.

For example, a log file might overwrite a log file of the same name.

Owner

When writing about the Owner role:

  • Use a capital O.
  • Write it out.
    • Use: if you are assigned the Owner role
    • Instead of: if you are an owner

Do not use bold.

Do not use Owner permissions. A user who is assigned the Owner role has a set of associated permissions. An Owner is the highest role a user can have.

package registry

When documenting the GitLab package registry features and functionality, use lowercase.

Use:

  • The GitLab package registry supports A, B, and C.
  • You can publish a package to your project’s package registry.

page

If you write a phrase like, “On the Issues page,” ensure steps for how to get to the page are nearby. Otherwise, people might not know what the Issues page is.

The page name should be visible in the UI at the top of the page. If it is not, you should be able to get the name from the breadcrumb.

The docs should match the case in the UI, and the page name should be bold. For example:

  • On the Test cases page, …

parent

Always use as a compound noun.

Do not use direct ancestor or ascendant.

Examples:

  • parent directory
  • parent group
  • parent project
  • parent commit
  • parent issue
  • parent item
  • parent epic
  • parent objective
  • parent pipeline

See also: child, and subgroup.

permissions

Do not use roles and permissions interchangeably. Each user is assigned a role. Each role includes a set of permissions.

Permissions are not the same as access levels.

personal access token

Use lowercase for personal access token.

please

Do not use please in the product documentation.

In UI text, use please when we’ve inconvenienced the user. For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

Premium

Use Premium, in uppercase, for the subscription tier. When you refer to Premium in the context of other subscription tiers, follow the subscription tier guidance.

preferences

Use preferences to describe user-specific, system-level settings like theme and layout.

prerequisites

Use prerequisites when documenting the tasks that must be completed or the conditions that must be met before a user can complete a task. Do not use requirements.

Prerequisites must always be plural, even if the list includes only one item.

For more information, see the task topic type.

For tutorial page types, use before you begin instead.

press

Use press when talking about keyboard keys. For example:

  • To stop the command, press Control+C.

profanity

Do not use profanity. Doing so may negatively affect other users and contributors, which is contrary to the GitLab value of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging.

provision

Use the term provision when referring to provisioning cloud infrastructure. You provision the infrastructure, and then deploy applications to it.

For example, you might write something like:

  • Provision an AWS EKS cluster and deploy your application to it.

push rules

Use lowercase for push rules.

README file

Use backticks and lowercase for the README file, or the README.md file.

When possible, use the full phrase: the README file

For plural, use README files.

recommend, we recommend

Instead of we recommend, use you should. We want to talk to the user the way we would talk to a colleague, and to avoid differentiation between we and them.

  • You should set the variable. (It’s recommended.)
  • Set the variable. (It’s required.)
  • You can set the variable. (It’s optional.)

See also recommended steps.

register

Use register instead of sign up when talking about creating an account.

remove

Use remove when an object continues to exist. For example, you can remove an issue from an epic, but the issue still exists.

When an object is completely deleted, use delete instead.

Reporter

When writing about the Reporter role:

  • Use a capital R.
  • Write it out.
    • Use: if you are assigned the Reporter role
    • Instead of: if you are a reporter
  • When the Reporter role is the minimum required role:
    • Use: at least the Reporter role
    • Instead of: the Reporter role or higher

Do not use bold.

Do not use Reporter permissions. A user who is assigned the Reporter role has a set of associated permissions.

Repository Mirroring

Use title case for Repository Mirroring.

resolution, resolve

Use resolution when the troubleshooting solution fixes the issue permanently. A resolution usually involves file and code changes to correct the problem. For example:

  • To resolve this issue, update the .gitlab-ci.yml file.
  • One resolution is to update the .gitlab-ci.yml file.

See also workaround.

requirements

When documenting the tasks that must be completed or the conditions that must be met before a user can complete the steps:

Do not use requirements.

reset

Use reset to describe the action associated with resetting an item to a new state.

respectively

Avoid respectively and be more precise instead.

Use:

  • To create a user, select Create user. For an existing user, select Save changes.

Instead of:

  • Select Create user or Save changes if you created a new user or edited an existing one respectively.

restore

See the Microsoft Style Guide for guidance on restore.

review app

Use lowercase for review app.

roles

Do not use roles and permissions interchangeably. Each user is assigned a role. Each role includes a set of permissions.

There are two types of roles: custom and default.

Roles are not the same as access levels.

Root cause analysis

Use sentence case for Root cause analysis.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Root cause analysis. Thereafter, use Root cause analysis by itself.

roll back

Use roll back for changing a GitLab version to an earlier one.

Do not use roll back for licensing or subscriptions. Use change the subscription tier instead.

runner, runners

Use lowercase for runners. These are the agents that run CI/CD jobs. See also GitLab Runner and this issue.

When referring to runners, if you have to specify that the runners are installed on a customer’s GitLab instance, use self-managed rather than self-hosted.

When referring to the scope of runners, use:

  • project runner: Associated with specific projects.
  • group runner: Available to all projects and subgroups in a group.
  • instance runner: Available to all groups and projects in a GitLab instance.

runner manager, runner managers

Use lowercase for runner managers. These are a type of runner that can create multiple runners for autoscaling. See also GitLab Runner.

runner worker, runner workers

Use lowercase for runner workers. This is the process created by the runner on the host computing platform to run jobs. See also GitLab Runner.

runner authentication token

Use runner authentication token instead of variations like runner token, authentication token, or token. Runners are assigned runner authentication tokens when they are created, and use them to authenticate with GitLab when they execute jobs.

Runner SaaS, SaaS runners

Do not use Runner SaaS or SaaS runners.

Use GitLab-hosted runners as the main feature name that describes runners hosted on GitLab.com and GitLab Dedicated.

To specify offerings and operating systems use:

  • hosted runners for GitLab.com
  • hosted runners for GitLab Dedicated
  • hosted runners on Linux for GitLab.com
  • hosted runners on Windows for GitLab.com

Do not use hosted runners without the GitLab- prefix or without the offering or operating system.

(s)

Do not use (s) to make a word optionally plural. It can slow down comprehension. For example:

Use:

  • Select the jobs you want.

Instead of:

  • Select the job(s) you want.

If you can select multiples of something, then write the word as plural.

sanity check

Do not use sanity check. Use check for completeness instead. (Vale rule: InclusionAbleism.yml)

scalability

Do not use scalability when talking about increasing GitLab performance for additional users. The words scale or scaling are sometimes acceptable, but references to increasing GitLab performance for additional users should direct readers to the GitLab reference architectures page.

When you search, you type a string in the search box on the left sidebar. The search results are displayed on a search page.

Searching is different from filtering.

seats

When referring to the subscription billing model:

  • For GitLab SaaS, use seats. Customers purchase seats. Users occupy seats when they are invited to a group, with some exceptions.
  • For GitLab self-managed, use users. Customers purchase subscriptions for a specified number of users.

section

Use section to describe an area on a page. For example, if a page has lines that separate the UI into separate areas, refer to these areas as sections.

We often think of expandable/collapsible areas as sections. When you refer to expanding or collapsing a section, don’t include the word section.

Use:

  • Expand Auto DevOps.

Instead of:

  • Do not: Expand the Auto DevOps section.

select

Use select with buttons, links, menu items, and lists. Select applies to more devices, while click is more specific to a mouse.

However, you can make an exception for right-click and click-through demo.

self-hosted model

Use self-hosted model (lowercase) to refer to a language model that’s hosted by a customer, rather than GitLab.

The language model might be an LLM (large language model), but it might not be.

self-managed

Use self-managed to refer to a customer’s installation of GitLab. Do not use self-hosted.

Service Desk

Use title case for Service Desk.

setup, set up

Use setup as a noun, and set up as a verb. For example:

  • Your remote office setup is amazing.
  • To set up your remote office correctly, consider the ergonomics of your work area.

Do not confuse set up with configure. Set up implies that it’s the first time you’ve done something. For example:

  1. Set up your installation.
  2. Configure your installation.

settings

A setting changes the default behavior of the product. A setting consists of a key/value pair, typically represented by a label with one or more options.

sign in, sign-in

To describe the action of signing in, use:

  • sign in.
  • sign in to as a verb. For example: Use your password to sign in to GitLab.

You can also use:

  • sign-in as a noun or adjective. For example: sign-in page or sign-in restrictions.
  • single sign-on.

Do not use:

If the user interface has different words, you can use those.

sign up

Use register instead of sign up when talking about creating an account.

signed-in user, signed in user

Use authenticated user instead of signed-in user or signed in user.

simply, simple

Do not use simply or simple. If the user doesn’t find the process to be simple, we lose their trust. (Vale rule: Simplicity.yml)

since

The word since indicates a timeframe. For example, Since 1984, Bon Jovi has existed. Don’t use since to mean because.

Use:

  • Because you have the Developer role, you can delete the widget.

Instead of:

  • Since you have the Developer role, you can delete the widget.

slashes

Instead of and/or, use or or re-write the sentence. This rule also applies to other slashes, like follow/unfollow. Some exceptions (like CI/CD) are allowed.

slave

Do not use slave. Another option is secondary. (Vale rule: InclusionCultural.yml)

storages

In the context of:

  • Gitaly, storage is physical and must be called a storage.
  • Gitaly Cluster, storage can be either:
    • Virtual and must be called a virtual storage.
    • Physical and must be called a physical storage.

Gitaly storages have physical paths and virtual storages have virtual paths.

subgroup

Use subgroup (no hyphen) instead of sub-group. Also, avoid using alternative terms for subgroups, such as child group or low-level group.

(Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

subscription tier

Do not confuse subscription or subscription tier with license. A user purchases a subscription. That subscription has a tier.

To describe tiers:

Instead of Use
In the Free tier or greater In all tiers
In the Free tier or higher In all tiers
In the Premium tier or greater In the Premium and Ultimate tier
In the Premium tier or higher In the Premium and Ultimate tier
In the Premium tier or lower In the Free and Premium tier

Suggested Reviewers

Use title case for Suggested Reviewers. On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Suggested Reviewers.

Suggested Reviewers should always be plural, and is capitalized even if it’s generic.

Examples:

  • Suggested Reviewers can recommend a person to review your merge request. (This phrase describes the feature.)
  • As you type, Suggested Reviewers are displayed. (This phrase is generic but still uses capital letters.)

tab

Use bold for tab names. For example:

  • The Pipelines tab
  • The Overview tab

that

Do not use that when describing a noun. For example:

Use:

  • The file you save…

Instead of:

  • The file that you save…

See also this, these, that, those.

terminal

Use lowercase for terminal. For example:

  • Open a terminal.
  • From a terminal, run the docker login command.

Terraform Module Registry

Use title case for the GitLab Terraform Module Registry, but use lowercase m when talking about non-specific modules. For example:

  • You can publish a Terraform module to your project’s Terraform Module Registry.

Test generation

Use sentence case for Test generation.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Test generation. Thereafter, use Test generation by itself.

text box

Use text box instead of field or box when referring to the UI element.

there is, there are

Try to avoid there is and there are. These phrases hide the subject.

Use:

  • The bucket has holes.

Instead of:

  • There are holes in the bucket.

they

Avoid the use of gender-specific pronouns, unless referring to a specific person. Use a singular they as a gender-neutral pronoun.

this, these, that, those

Always follow these words with a noun. For example:

  • Use: This setting improves performance.
  • Instead of: This improves performance.

  • Use: These pants are the best.
  • Instead of: These are the best.

  • Use: That droid is the one you are looking for.
  • Instead of: That is the one you are looking for.

  • Use: Those settings need to be configured. (Or even better, Configure those settings.)
  • Instead of: Those need to be configured.

to which, of which

Try to avoid to which and of which, and let the preposition dangle at the end of the sentence instead. For examples, see Prepositions.

to-do item

Use lowercase and hyphenate to-do item. (Vale rule: ToDo.yml)

To-Do List

Use title case for To-Do List. (Vale rule: ToDo.yml)

toggle

You turn on or turn off a toggle. For example:

  • Turn on the blah toggle.

TFA, two-factor authentication

Use 2FA and two-factor authentication instead.

type

Use type when the cursor remains where you’re typing. For example, in a search box, you begin typing and search results appear. You do not click out of the search box.

For example:

  • To view all users named Alex, type Al.
  • To view all labels for the documentation team, type doc.
  • For a list of quick actions, type /.

See also enter.

Ultimate

Use Ultimate, in uppercase, for the subscription tier. When you refer to Ultimate in the context of other subscription tiers, follow the subscription tier guidance.

undo

See the Microsoft Style Guide for guidance on undo.

units of measurement

Use a space between the number and the unit of measurement. For example, 128 GB. (Vale rule: Units.yml)

For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

update

Use update for installing a newer patch version of the software only. For example:

  • Update GitLab from 14.9 to 14.9.1.

Do not use update for any other case. Instead, use upgrade.

upgrade

Use upgrade for:

  • Choosing a higher subscription tier (Premium or Ultimate).
  • Installing a newer major (13.0) or minor (13.2) version of GitLab.

For example:

  • Upgrade to GitLab Ultimate.
  • Upgrade GitLab from 14.0 to 14.1.
  • Upgrade GitLab from 14.0 to 15.0.

Use caution with the phrase Upgrade GitLab without any other text. Ensure the surrounding text clarifies whether you’re talking about the product version or the subscription tier.

See also downgrade and roll back.

upper left, upper right

Use upper-left corner and upper-right corner to provide direction in the UI. If the UI element is not in a corner, use upper left and upper right.

Do not use top left and top right.

For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

useful

Do not use useful. If the user doesn’t find the process to be useful, we lose their trust. (Vale rule: Simplicity.yml)

user account

You create a user account. The user account has an access level. When you add a user account to a group or project, the user account becomes a member.

using

Avoid using in most cases. It hides the subject and makes the phrase more difficult to translate. Use by using, that use, or re-write the sentence.

For example:

  • Instead of: The files using storage…
  • Use: The files that use storage…

  • Instead of: Change directories using the command line.
  • Use: Change directories by using the command line. Or even better: To change directories, use the command line.

utilize

Do not use utilize. Use use instead. It’s more succinct and easier for non-native English speakers to understand. (Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

Value stream forecasting

Use sentence case for Value stream forecasting. On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Value stream forecasting.

Thereafter, use Value stream forecasting by itself.

version, v

To describe versions of GitLab, use GitLab <version number>. For example:

  • You must have GitLab 16.0 or later.

To describe other software, use the same style as the documentation for that software. For example:

  • In Kubernetes 1.4, you can…

Pay attention to spacing by the letter v. In semantic versioning, no space exists after the v. For example:

  • v1.2.3

via

Do not use Latin abbreviations. Use with, through, or by using instead. (Vale rule: LatinTerms.yml)

Vulnerability resolution

Use sentence case for Vulnerability resolution.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Vulnerability resolution. Thereafter, use Vulnerability resolution by itself.

Vulnerability explanation

Use sentence case for Vulnerability explanation.

On first mention on a page, use GitLab Duo Vulnerability explanation. Thereafter, use Vulnerability explanation by itself.

we

Try to avoid we and focus instead on how the user can accomplish something in GitLab.

Use:

  • Use widgets when you have work you want to organize.

Instead of:

  • We created a feature for you to add widgets.

workaround

Use workaround when the troubleshooting solution is a temporary fix. A workaround is usually an immediate fix and might have ongoing issues. For example:

  • The workaround is to temporarily pin your template to the deprecated version.

See also resolution.

while

Use while to refer only to something occurring in time. For example, Leave the window open while the process runs.

Do not use while for comparison. For example, use:

  • Job 1 can run quickly. However, job 2 is more precise.

Instead of:

  • While job 1 can run quickly, job 2 is more precise.

For more information, see the Microsoft Style Guide.

whilst

Do not use whilst. Use while instead. While is more succinct and easier for non-native English speakers to understand.

whitelist

Do not use whitelist. Another option is allowlist. (Vale rule: InclusionCultural.yml)

within

When possible, do not use within. Use in instead, unless you are referring to a time frame, limit, or boundary. For example:

  • The upgrade occurs within the four-hour maintenance window.
  • The Wi-Fi signal is accessible within a 30-foot radius.

(Vale rule: SubstitutionWarning.yml)

yet

Do not use yet when talking about the product or its features. The documentation describes the product as it is today.

Sometimes you might need to use yet when writing a task. If you use yet, ensure the surrounding phrases are written in present tense, active voice.

View guidance about how to write about future features.

you, your, yours

Use you instead of the user, the administrator or the customer. Documentation should speak directly to the user, whether that user is someone installing the product, configuring it, administering it, or using it.

Use:

  • You can configure a pipeline.
  • You can reset a user’s password. (In content for an administrator)

Instead of:

  • Users can configure a pipeline.
  • Administrators can reset a user’s password.

you can

When possible, start sentences with an active verb instead of you can. For example:

  • Use code review analytics to view merge request data.
  • Create a board to organize your team tasks.
  • Configure variables to restrict pushes to a repository.
  • Add links to external accounts you have, like Skype and Twitter.

Use you can for optional actions. For example:

  • Use code review analytics to view metrics per merge request. You can also use the API.
  • Enter the name and value pairs. You can add up to 20 pairs per streaming destination.