GitLab Documentation

Configuring a Database for GitLab HA

You can choose to install and manage a database server (PostgreSQL/MySQL) yourself, or you can use GitLab Omnibus packages to help. GitLab recommends PostgreSQL. This is the database that will be installed if you use the Omnibus package to manage your database.

Important notes:

  • This document will focus only on configuration supported with GitLab Enterprise Edition Premium, using the Omnibus GitLab package.
  • If you are a Community Edition or Enterprise Edition Starter user, consider using a cloud hosted solution.
  • This document will not cover installations from source.

  • If HA setup is not what you were looking for, see the database configuration document for the Omnibus GitLab packages.

Configure your own database server

If you're hosting GitLab on a cloud provider, you can optionally use a managed service for PostgreSQL. For example, AWS offers a managed Relational Database Service (RDS) that runs PostgreSQL.

If you use a cloud-managed service, or provide your own PostgreSQL:

  1. Setup PostgreSQL according to the database requirements document.
  2. Set up a gitlab username with a password of your choice. The gitlab user needs privileges to create the gitlabhq_production database.
  3. Configure the GitLab application servers with the appropriate details. This step is covered in Configuring GitLab for HA.

Configure using Omnibus for High Availability

Please read this document fully before attempting to configure PostgreSQL HA for GitLab.

This configuration is GA in EE 10.2.

The recommended configuration for a PostgreSQL HA requires:

You also need to take into consideration the underlying network topology, making sure you have redundant connectivity between all Database and GitLab instances, otherwise the networks will become a single point of failure.

Architecture

PG HA Architecture

Database nodes run two services besides PostgreSQL

  1. Repmgrd -- monitors the cluster and handles failover in case of an issue with the master

The failover consists of

On failure, the old master node is automatically evicted from the cluster, and should be rejoined manually once recovered.

  1. Consul -- Monitors the status of each node in the database cluster, and tracks its health in a service definiton on the consul cluster.

Alongside pgbouncer, there is a consul agent that watches the status of the PostgreSQL service. If that status changes, consul runs a script which updates the configuration and reloads pgbouncer

Connection flow

Each service in the package comes with a set of default ports. You may need to make specific firewall rules for the connections listed below:

Required information

Before proceeding with configuration, you will need to collect all the necessary information.

Network information

PostgreSQL does not listen on any network interface by default. It needs to know which IP address to listen on in order to be accessible to other services. Similarly, PostgreSQL access is controlled based on the network source.

This is why you will need:

IP address of each nodes network interface

  • This can be set to 0.0.0.0 to listen on all interfaces. It cannot be set to the loopack address 127.0.0.1

Network Address

  • This can be in subnet (i.e. 192.168.0.0/255.255.255.0) or CIDR (i.e. 192.168.0.0/24) form.

User information

Various services require different configuration to secure the communication as well as information required for running the service. Bellow you will find details on each service and the minimum required information you need to provide.

Consul information

When using default setup, minimum configuration requires:

Few notes on the service itself:

PostgreSQL information

When configuring PostgreSQL, we will set max_wal_senders to one more than the number of database nodes in the cluster. This is used to prevent replication from using up all of the available database connections.

Note:

  • In this document we are assuming 3 database nodes, which makes this configuration:
postgresql['max_wal_senders'] = 4

As previously mentioned, you'll have to prepare the network subnets that will be allowed to authenticate with the database. You'll also need to supply the IP addresses or DNS records of Consul server nodes.

We will need the following password information for the application's database user:

Pgbouncer information

When using default setup, minimum configuration requires:

Few notes on the service itself:

Repmgr information

When using default setup, you will only have to prepare the network subnets that will be allowed to authenticate with the service.

Few notes on the service itself:

Installing Omnibus GitLab

First, make sure to download/install GitLab Omnibus on each node.

Make sure you install the necessary dependencies from step 1, add GitLab package repository from step 2. When installing the GitLab package, do not supply EXTERNAL_URL value.

Configuring the Consul nodes

On each Consul node perform the following:

  1. Make sure you collect CONSUL_SERVER_NODES before executing the next step.

  2. Edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb replacing values noted in the # START user configuration section:

    # Disable all components except Consul
    bootstrap['enable'] = false
    gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false
    gitaly['enable'] = false
    gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
    mailroom['enable'] = false
    nginx['enable'] = false
    postgresql['enable'] = false
    redis['enable'] = false
    sidekiq['enable'] = false
    prometheus['enable'] = false
    unicorn['enable'] = false
    
    consul['enable'] = true
    # START user configuration
    # Replace placeholders:
    #
    # Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z
    # with the addresses gathered for CONSUL_SERVER_NODES
    consul['configuration'] = {
      server: true,
      retry_join: %w(Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z)
    }
    #
    # END user configuration
    
  3. Reconfigure GitLab for the changes to take effect.

Consul Checkpoint

Before moving on, make sure Consul is configured correctly. Run the following command to verify all server nodes are communicating:

/opt/gitlab/embedded/bin/consul members

The output should be similar to:

Node                 Address               Status  Type    Build  Protocol  DC
CONSUL_NODE_ONE      XXX.XXX.XXX.YYY:8301  alive   server  0.9.2  2         gitlab_consul
CONSUL_NODE_TWO      XXX.XXX.XXX.YYY:8301  alive   server  0.9.2  2         gitlab_consul
CONSUL_NODE_THREE    XXX.XXX.XXX.YYY:8301  alive   server  0.9.2  2         gitlab_consul

If any of the nodes isn't alive or if any of the three nodes are missing, check the Troubleshooting section before proceeding.

Configuring the Database nodes

On each database node perform the following:

  1. Make sure you collect CONSUL_SERVER_NODES, PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH, POSTGRESQL_PASSWORD_HASH, Number of db nodes, and Network Address before executing the next step.

  2. Edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb replacing values noted in the # START user configuration section:

    # Disable all components except PostgreSQL and Repmgr and Consul
    bootstrap['enable'] = false
    gitaly['enable'] = false
    mailroom['enable'] = false
    nginx['enable'] = false
    unicorn['enable'] = false
    sidekiq['enable'] = false
    redis['enable'] = false
    gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
    prometheus_monitoring['enable'] = false
    
    repmgr['enable'] = true
    postgresql['enable'] = true
    consul['enable'] = true
    
    # PostgreSQL configuration
    postgresql['listen_address'] = '0.0.0.0'
    postgresql['hot_standby'] = 'on'
    postgresql['wal_level'] = 'replica'
    postgresql['shared_preload_libraries'] = 'repmgr_funcs'
    
    # Disable automatic database migrations
    gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false
    
    # Configure the consul agent
    consul['services'] = %w(postgresql)
    
    # START user configuration
    # Please set the real values as explained in Required Information section
    #
    # Replace PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH with a generated md5 value
    postgresql['pgbouncer_user_password'] = 'PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH'
    # Replace POSTGRESQL_PASSWORD_HASH with a generated md5 value
    postgresql['sql_user_password'] = 'POSTGRESQL_PASSWORD_HASH'
    # Replace X with value of number of db nodes + 1
    postgresql['max_wal_senders'] = X
    
    # Replace XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/YY with Network Address
    postgresql['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/YY)
    repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/YY)
    
    # Replace placeholders:
    #
    # Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z
    # with the addresses gathered for CONSUL_SERVER_NODES
    consul['configuration'] = {
      retry_join: %w(Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z)
    }
    #
    # END user configuration
    
  3. Reconfigure GitLab for the changes to take effect.

Please note:

  • If you want your database to listen on a specific interface, change the config: postgresql['listen_address'] = '0.0.0.0'
  • If your Pgbouncer service runs under a different user account, you also need to specify: postgresql['pgbouncer_user'] = PGBOUNCER_USERNAME in your configuration

Database nodes post-configuration

Primary node

Select one node as a primary node.

  1. Open a database prompt:

    gitlab-psql -d gitlabhq_production
    
  2. Enable the pg_trgm extension:

    CREATE EXTENSION pg_trgm;
    
  3. Exit the database prompt by typing \q and Enter.

  4. Verify the cluster is initialized with one node:

     gitlab-ctl repmgr cluster show
    

    The output should be similar to the following:

     Role      | Name     | Upstream | Connection String
     ----------+----------|----------|----------------------------------------
     * master  | HOSTNAME |          | host=HOSTNAME user=gitlab_repmgr dbname=gitlab_repmgr
    
  5. Note down the hostname/ip in the connection string: host=HOSTNAME. We will refer to the hostname in the next section as MASTER_NODE_NAME. If the value is not an IP address, it will need to be a resolvable name (via DNS or /etc/hosts)

Secondary nodes
  1. Setup the repmgr standby:

    gitlab-ctl repmgr standby setup MASTER_NODE_NAME
    

    Do note that this will remove the existing data on the node. The command has a wait time.

    The output should be similar to the following:

    # gitlab-ctl repmgr standby setup MASTER_NODE_NAME
    Doing this will delete the entire contents of /var/opt/gitlab/postgresql/data
    If this is not what you want, hit Ctrl-C now to exit
    To skip waiting, rerun with the -w option
    Sleeping for 30 seconds
    Stopping the database
    Removing the data
    Cloning the data
    Starting the database
    Registering the node with the cluster
    ok: run: repmgrd: (pid 19068) 0s
    
  2. Verify the node now appears in the cluster:

     gitlab-ctl repmgr cluster show
    

    The output should be similar to the following:

     Role      | Name    | Upstream  | Connection String
     ----------+---------|-----------|------------------------------------------------
     * master  | MASTER  |           | host=MASTER_NODE_NAME user=gitlab_repmgr dbname=gitlab_repmgr
       standby | STANDBY | MASTER    | host=STANDBY_HOSTNAME user=gitlab_repmgr dbname=gitlab_repmgr
    

Repeat the above steps on all secondary nodes.

Database checkpoint

Before moving on, make sure the databases are configured correctly. Run the following command on the primary node to verify that replication is working properly:

gitlab-ctl repmgr cluster show

The output should be similar to:

Role      | Name         | Upstream     | Connection String
----------+--------------|--------------|--------------------------------------------------------------------
* master  | MASTER  |        | host=MASTER port=5432 user=gitlab_repmgr dbname=gitlab_repmgr
  standby | STANDBY | MASTER | host=STANDBY port=5432 user=gitlab_repmgr dbname=gitlab_repmgr

If the 'Role' column for any node says "FAILED", check the Troubleshooting section before proceeding.

Configuring the Pgbouncer node

  1. Make sure you collect CONSUL_SERVER_NODES, CONSUL_PASSWORD_HASH, and PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH before executing the next step.

  2. Edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb replacing values noted in the # START user configuration section:

    # Disable all components except Pgbouncer and Consul agent
    bootstrap['enable'] = false
    gitaly['enable'] = false
    mailroom['enable'] = false
    nginx['enable'] = false
    redis['enable'] = false
    prometheus['enable'] = false
    postgresql['enable'] = false
    unicorn['enable'] = false
    sidekiq['enable'] = false
    gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
    gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false
    
    pgbouncer['enable'] = true
    consul['enable'] = true
    
    # Configure Pgbouncer
    pgbouncer['admin_users'] = %w(pgbouncer gitlab-consul)
    
    # Configure Consul agent
    consul['watchers'] = %w(postgresql)
    
    # START user configuration
    # Please set the real values as explained in Required Information section
    # Replace CONSUL_PASSWORD_HASH with with a generated md5 value
    # Replace PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH with with a generated md5 value
    pgbouncer['users'] = {
      'gitlab-consul': {
        password: 'CONSUL_PASSWORD_HASH'
      },
      'pgbouncer': {
        password: 'PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD_HASH'
      }
    }
    # Replace placeholders:
    #
    # Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z
    # with the addresses gathered for CONSUL_SERVER_NODES
    consul['configuration'] = {
      retry_join: %w(Y.Y.Y.Y consul1.gitlab.example.com Z.Z.Z.Z)
    }
    #
    # END user configuration
    
  3. Reconfigure GitLab for the changes to take effect.

  4. Create a .pgpass file so Consule is able to reload pgbouncer. Enter the PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD twice when asked:

     gitlab-ctl write-pgpass --host 127.0.0.1 --database pgbouncer --user pgbouncer --hostuser gitlab-consul
    

PGBouncer Checkpoint

  1. Ensure the node is talking to the current master:

     gitlab-ctl pgb-console # You will be prompted for PGBOUNCER_PASSWORD
    

    If there is an error psql: ERROR: Auth failed after typing in the password, ensure you previously generated the MD5 password hashes with the correct format. The correct format is to concatenate the password and the username: PASSWORDUSERNAME. For example, Sup3rS3cr3tpgbouncer would be the text needed to generate an MD5 password hash for the pgbouncer user.

  2. Once the console prompt is available, run the following queries:

     show databases ; show clients ;
    

    The output should be similar to the following:

             name         |  host       | port |      database       | force_user | pool_size | reserve_pool | pool_mode | max_connections | current_connections
     ---------------------+-------------+------+---------------------+------------+-----------+--------------+-----------+-----------------+---------------------
      gitlabhq_production | MASTER_HOST | 5432 | gitlabhq_production |            |        20 |            0 |           |               0 |                   0
      pgbouncer           |             | 6432 | pgbouncer           | pgbouncer  |         2 |            0 | statement |               0 |                   0
     (2 rows)
    
      type |   user    |      database       |  state  |   addr         | port  | local_addr | local_port |    connect_time     |    request_time     |    ptr    | link | remote_pid | tls
     ------+-----------+---------------------+---------+----------------+-------+------------+------------+---------------------+---------------------+-----------+------+------------+-----
      C    | pgbouncer | pgbouncer           | active  | 127.0.0.1      | 56846 | 127.0.0.1  |       6432 | 2017-08-21 18:09:59 | 2017-08-21 18:10:48 | 0x22b3880 |      |          0 |
     (2 rows)
    

Configuring the Application nodes

These will be the nodes running the gitlab-rails service. You may have other attributes set, but the following need to be set.

  1. Edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

    # Disable PostgreSQL on the application node
    postgresql['enable'] = false
    
    gitlab_rails['db_host'] = 'PGBOUNCER_NODE'
    gitlab_rails['db_port'] = 6432
    gitlab_rails['db_password'] = 'POSTGRESQL_USER_PASSWORD'
    gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false
    
  2. Reconfigure GitLab for the changes to take effect.

Application node post-configuration

Ensure that all migrations ran:

gitlab-rake gitlab:db:configure

Ensure GitLab is running

At this point, your GitLab instance should be up and running. Verify you are able to login, and create issues and merge requests. If you have troubles check the Troubleshooting section.

Example configuration

Here we'll show you some fully expanded example configurations.

This example uses 3 consul servers, 3 postgresql servers, and 1 application node.

We start with all servers on the same 10.6.0.0/16 private network range, they can connect to each freely other on those addresses.

Here is a list and description of each machine and the assigned IP:

All passwords are set to toomanysecrets, please do not use this password or derived hashes.

The external_url for GitLab is http://gitlab.example.com

Please note that after the initial configuration, if a failover occurs, the PostgresSQL master will change to one of the available secondaries until it is failed back.

On each server edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

# Disable all components except Consul
bootstrap['enable'] = false
gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false
gitaly['enable'] = false
gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
mailroom['enable'] = false
nginx['enable'] = false
postgresql['enable'] = false
redis['enable'] = false
sidekiq['enable'] = false
prometheus['enable'] = false
unicorn['enable'] = false

consul['enable'] = true
consul['configuration'] = {
  server: true,
  retry_join: %w(10.6.0.11 10.6.0.12 10.6.0.13)
}

Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab for the changes to take effect.

On each server edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

# Disable all components except PostgreSQL and Repmgr and Consul
bootstrap['enable'] = false
gitaly['enable'] = false
mailroom['enable'] = false
nginx['enable'] = false
unicorn['enable'] = false
sidekiq['enable'] = false
redis['enable'] = false
gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
prometheus_monitoring['enable'] = false

repmgr['enable'] = true
postgresql['enable'] = true
consul['enable'] = true

# PostgreSQL configuration
postgresql['listen_address'] = '0.0.0.0'
postgresql['hot_standby'] = 'on'
postgresql['wal_level'] = 'replica'
postgresql['shared_preload_libraries'] = 'repmgr_funcs'

# Disable automatic database migrations
gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false

# Configure the consul agent
consul['services'] = %w(postgresql)

postgresql['pgbouncer_user_password'] = '771a8625958a529132abe6f1a4acb19c'
postgresql['sql_user_password'] = '450409b85a0223a214b5fb1484f34d0f'
postgresql['max_wal_senders'] = 4

postgresql['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(10.6.0.0/16)
repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(10.6.0.0/16)

consul['configuration'] = {
  retry_join: %w(10.6.0.11 10.6.0.12 10.6.0.13)
}

Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab for the changes to take effect.

On the server edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

external_url 'http://gitlab.example.com'

gitlab_rails['db_host'] = '127.0.0.1'
gitlab_rails['db_port'] = 6432
gitlab_rails['db_password'] = 'toomanysecrets'
gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false

postgresql['enable'] = false
pgbouncer['enable'] = true
consul['enable'] = true

# Configure Pgbouncer
pgbouncer['admin_users'] = %w(pgbouncer gitlab-consul)

# Configure Consul agent
consul['watchers'] = %w(postgresql)

pgbouncer['users'] = {
  'gitlab-consul': {
    password: '5e0e3263571e3704ad655076301d6ebe'
  },
  'pgbouncer': {
    password: '771a8625958a529132abe6f1a4acb19c'
  }
}

consul['configuration'] = {
  retry_join: %w(10.6.0.11 10.6.0.12 10.6.0.13)
}

Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab for the changes to take effect.

After deploying the configuration follow these steps:

  1. On 10.6.0.21, our primary database

    Enable the pg_trgm extension

    gitlab-psql -d gitlabhq_production
    
    CREATE EXTENSION pg_trgm;
    
  2. On 10.6.0.22, our first standby database

    Make this node a standby of the primary

    gitlab-ctl repmgr standby setup 10.6.0.21
    
  3. On 10.6.0.23, our second standby database

    Make this node a standby of the primary

    gitlab-ctl repmgr standby setup 10.6.0.21
    
  4. On 10.6.0.31, our application server

    Set gitlab-consul's pgbouncer password to toomanysecrets

    gitlab-ctl write-pgpass --host 127.0.0.1 --database pgbouncer --user pgbouncer --hostuser gitlab-consul
    

    Run database migrations

    gitlab-rake gitlab:db:configure
    

Example minimal setup

This example uses 3 postgresql servers, and 1 application node.

It differs from the recommended setup by moving the consul servers into the same servers we use for PostgreSQL. The trade-off is between reducing server counts, against the increased operational complexity of needing to deal with postgres failover and restore procedures in addition to consul outage recovery on the same set of machines.

In this example we start with all servers on the same 10.6.0.0/16 private network range, they can connect to each freely other on those addresses.

Here is a list and description of each machine and the assigned IP:

All passwords are set to toomanysecrets, please do not use this password or derived hashes.

The external_url for GitLab is http://gitlab.example.com

Please note that after the initial configuration, if a failover occurs, the PostgresSQL master will change to one of the available secondaries until it is failed back.

Example minimal configuration for database servers

On each server edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

# Disable all components except PostgreSQL, Repmgr, and Consul
bootstrap['enable'] = false
gitaly['enable'] = false
mailroom['enable'] = false
nginx['enable'] = false
unicorn['enable'] = false
sidekiq['enable'] = false
redis['enable'] = false
gitlab_workhorse['enable'] = false
prometheus_monitoring['enable'] = false

repmgr['enable'] = true
postgresql['enable'] = true
consul['enable'] = true

# PostgreSQL configuration
postgresql['listen_address'] = '0.0.0.0'
postgresql['hot_standby'] = 'on'
postgresql['wal_level'] = 'replica'
postgresql['shared_preload_libraries'] = 'repmgr_funcs'

# Disable automatic database migrations
gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false

# Configure the consul agent
consul['services'] = %w(postgresql)

postgresql['pgbouncer_user_password'] = '771a8625958a529132abe6f1a4acb19c'
postgresql['sql_user_password'] = '450409b85a0223a214b5fb1484f34d0f'
postgresql['max_wal_senders'] = 4

postgresql['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(10.6.0.0/16)
repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(10.6.0.0/16)

consul['configuration'] = {
  server: true,
  retry_join: %w(10.6.0.21 10.6.0.22 10.6.0.23)
}

Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab for the changes to take effect.

Example minimal configuration for application server

On the server edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

external_url 'http://gitlab.example.com'

gitlab_rails['db_host'] = '127.0.0.1'
gitlab_rails['db_port'] = 6432
gitlab_rails['db_password'] = 'toomanysecrets'
gitlab_rails['auto_migrate'] = false

postgresql['enable'] = false
pgbouncer['enable'] = true
consul['enable'] = true

# Configure Pgbouncer
pgbouncer['admin_users'] = %w(pgbouncer gitlab-consul)

# Configure Consul agent
consul['watchers'] = %w(postgresql)

pgbouncer['users'] = {
  'gitlab-consul': {
    password: '5e0e3263571e3704ad655076301d6ebe'
  },
  'pgbouncer': {
    password: '771a8625958a529132abe6f1a4acb19c'
  }
}

consul['configuration'] = {
  retry_join: %w(10.6.0.21 10.6.0.22 10.6.0.23)
}

Reconfigure Omnibus GitLab for the changes to take effect.

Example minimal setup manual steps

The manual steps for this configuration are the same as for the example recommended setup.

Failover procedure

By default, if the master database fails, repmgrd should promote one of the standby nodes to master automatically, and consul will update pgbouncer with the new master.

If you need to failover manually, you have two options:

Shutdown the current master database

Run:

gitlab-ctl stop postgresql

The automated failover process will see this and failover to one of the standby nodes.

Or perform a manual failover

  1. Ensure the old master node is not still active.
  2. Login to the server that should become the new master and run:

    gitlab-ctl repmgr standby promote
    
  3. If there are any other standby servers in the cluster, have them follow the new master server:

    gitlab-ctl repmgr standby follow NEW_MASTER
    

Restore procedure

If a node fails, it can be removed from the cluster, or added back as a standby after it has been restored to service.

Alternate configurations

Database authorization

By default, we give any host on the database network the permission to perform repmgr operations using PostgreSQL's trust method. If you do not want this level of trust, there are alternatives.

You can trust only the specific nodes that will be database clusters, or you can require md5 authentication.

Trust specific addresses

If you know the IP address, or FQDN of all database and pgbouncer nodes in the cluster, you can trust only those nodes.

In /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb on all of the database nodes, set repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] to an array of strings containing all of the addresses.

If setting to a node's FQDN, they must have a corresponding PTR record in DNS. If setting to a node's IP address, specify it as XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/32.

For example:

repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] = %w(192.168.1.44/32 db2.example.com)
MD5 Authentication

If you are running on an untrusted network, repmgr can use md5 authentication with a .pgpass file to authenticate.

You can specify by IP address, FQDN, or by subnet, using the same format as in the previous section:

  1. On the current master node, create a password for the gitlab and gitlab_repmgr user:

    gitlab-psql -d template1
    template1=# \password gitlab_repmgr
    Enter password: ****
    Confirm password: ****
    template1=# \password gitlab
    
  2. On each database node:

    1. Edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:
    2. Ensure repmgr['trust_auth_cidr_addresses'] is not set
    3. Set postgresql['md5_auth_cidr_addresses'] to the desired value
    4. Set postgresql['sql_replication_user'] = 'gitlab_repmgr'
    5. Reconfigure with gitlab-ctl reconfigure
    6. Restart postgresql with gitlab-ctl restart postgresql
    7. Create a .pgpass file. Enter the gitlab_repmgr password twice to when asked:

      gitlab-ctl write-pgpass --user gitlab_repmgr --hostuser gitlab-psql --database '*'
      
  3. On each pgbouncer node, edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb:

    1. Ensure gitlab_rails['db_password'] is set to the plaintext password for the gitlab database user
    2. Reconfigure GitLab for the changes to take effect

Troubleshooting

Consul and PostgreSQL changes not taking effect.

Due to the potential impacts, gitlab-ctl reconfigure only reloads Consul and PostgreSQL, it will not restart the services. However, not all changes can be activated by reloading.

To restart either service, run gitlab-ctl restart SERVICE

For PostgreSQL, it is usually safe to restart the master node by default. Automatic failover defaults to a 1 minute timeout. Provided the database returns before then, nothing else needs to be done. To be safe, you can stop repmgrd on the standby nodes first with gitlab-ctl stop repmgrd, then start afterwards with gitlab-ctl start repmgrd.

On the consul server nodes, it is important to restart the consul service in a controlled fashion. Read our consul documentation for instructions on how to restart the service.

Issues with other components

If you're running into an issue with a component not outlined here, be sure to check the troubleshooting section of their specific documentation page.

Configure using Omnibus

Note: We recommend that you follow the instructions here for a full PostgreSQL cluster. If you are reading this section due to an old bookmark, you can find that old documentation in the repository.


Read more on high-availability configuration:

  1. Configure Redis
  2. Configure NFS
  3. Configure the GitLab application servers
  4. Configure the load balancers
  5. Manage the bundled Consul cluster

Leave a comment below if you have any feedback on the documentation. For support and other inquires, see getting help.